Trout kibbeh

0
92
Trout kibbeh
  • 0:20 Prep
  • Makes 8
  • Capable cooks

Mezze is more than just food, it’s a way of life. Learn secrets to the art of grazing with this tasty recipe.

Featured in
Starters recipes, Lebanese recipes

Ingredients

  • 55g (1/3 cup) fine burghul (see note)
  • 500g sashimi-grade skinless ocean trout, (see note) pin-boned, belly fat trimmed, chopped
  • 4 eschalots, finely grated
  • 1/2 teaspoon sumac (see note)
  • 1 long green chilli, seeded, finely chopped
  • 1/4 cup coriander leaves
  • Extra virgin olive oil, to drizzle
  • Lemon cheeks, to serve
  • Flat bread, to serve

Method

  • Step 1
    Place burghul in a bowl, add enough cold water to cover, then set aside for 1 hour or until softened. Drain in a sieve over a bowl, pressing down with the back of a spoon to drain excess moisture. Transfer to a bowl. Discard liquid.
  • Step 2
    Process fish in a food processor to a smooth paste. Add fish, eschalots and sumac to burghul. Using your hands, combine well. If mixture is very thick, add an ice cube and stir until melted.
  • Step 3
    Spoon kibbeh onto a platter and smooth the surface with the back of a spoon. Scatter with chilli and coriander, drizzle with oil and season with pepper.
  • Step 4
    Serve trout kibbeh with lemon wedges and toasted flat bread.

  • High protein
  • Low carb
  • Low fat
  • Low kilojoule
  • Low sodium
  • Low sugar

Nutrition

  • 506 kj

    Energy

  • 5g

    Fat Total

  • 2g

    Saturated Fat

  • 1g

    Fibre

  • 13g

    Protein

  • 37mg

    Cholesterol

  • 46.61mg

    Sodium

  • 4g

    Carbs (total)

All nutrition values are per serve

Notes

Serves 8 as a mezze.

The best raw kibbeh is traditionally made from top-quality fresh meat, which is pounded in a large stone mortar to a fine paste. For a twist, this recipe uses fish instead of meat. Allow an extra hour to soak the burghul.

Tips: Burghul (cracked wheat), available from the health food section of supermarkets, is whole wheat that has been partially boiled, cracked and dried.

Sashimi-grade trout is valued for its impeccable freshness and should be used when eating raw or partially cooked fish.

Sumac is a reddish-brown, sour ground Middle Eastern spice available from supermarkets.

  • Author: Kamal Mouzawak
  • Image credit: Brett Stevens
  • Publication: MasterChef

Source: taste.com.au

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